Robert asks…

Can anyone recommend a good quality affordable portable walking foot sewing machine?

I am looking for recommendations on a dependable yet affordable (under $500) portable walking foot sewing machine– not a walking foot attachment but an actual machine. Any advice is appreciated! Thanks.

admin answers:

Http://www.sewingmachinesplus.com/walking-foot-sewing-machines.php?gclid=CLXqucK9-qICFRFMagodplOsnw gives you some options… What are you trying to sew? You might also want to look at needlefeed machines.

If you’re looking for a home machine with multiple stitches, then you might look at used Pfaffs with IDT (which is a pawl that you can engage or disengage as a top feeder), or you might look at some of the used pinfeed machines.

Walking foot machine: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X72ybCf1BYg

Needle feed machine: http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/needle-feed-sewing-machines/

To answer your first question, a used Sailrite is probably the first machine most would think of.

Pfaff/IDT: http://www.pfaffmachines.co.uk/pfaff-idt.htm

Brother pinfeed: http://www.brother-usa.com/Homesewing/ModelDetail.aspx?ProductID=PQ1500S

http://www.fashion-incubator.com/archive/shopping_industrial_machines/

Steven asks…

In the real life Bratz movie Jade had a portable sewing machine…?

When she was making their clown oufits into “Clown Couture” Are sewing machines like that available in stores… If so, which stores?

admin answers:

Yes – portable sewing machines are very popular with people who go to sewing or quilting classes, as they can be put in the back of a car and taken wherever. You need to look for stores in your town, or sites in your own country where postage charges won’t be too expensive, and most sewing machine shops will have a range of them. A shop is better, as you can try before you buy.

Ruth asks…

how much is a portable sewing machine?

I saw online some sewing machines that are worth 80-100$ .. Is this for real or is this bogus?

I saw a brother sewing machine that is worth 300$ on their official website…sigh… I only just want to make my own dresses.. lol

admin answers:

If you are referring to a machine that works on an AC adapter/batteries as being portable – forget it they do no have enough go power.

The Singer 1507 and 2263 are good little machines that I would consider to be portable in that you can easily pick them up, carry them from place to place by yourself. They plug into an electric outlet.

The 1507 sells at Meijer for around $99 and the accessories include a zipper foot.

The 2263 sells at Walmart for $89 and does not have the zipper foot, which will cost between $9 and $13. I bought this one for the 2263 – http://www.amapparelsupply.com/servlet/the-8969/Brother,-Babylock-Zipper-Foot/Detail

I use both models and they are very good machines. Not as super great as the ones that cost thousands, but have the same basics.

Charles asks…

How do you use one of those antique ”SINGER portable electric sewing machine 128-23”?

sewing singer machines .

admin answers:

Pretty much like any sewing machine. Free manual here:

http://singerco.com/accessories/manuals.html

Carol asks…

How good is portable sewing machines

Hi, I m planning to purchase a portable sewing machine.Can anyone suggest which is the best one functionally and wat wud be its cost(approx.).I need a sewing machine for jest small purposes like altering my dresses, stitching cusion covers, stitching borders, and other alteration works. I want to know is it worth purchasing a portable one.

Where can i get a portable sewing machine in pune(india)

admin answers:

Portable home sewing machines are every bit as versatile as cabinet machines in the same class, and should be able to handle the tasks you’ve outlined. However, the hand-held machines are pretty worthless- an office stapler would do as well. Maybe better.

The brands of Indian machines I’ve seen advertized are not familiar to me, but here’s my standard suggestions for beginners buying a machine:

http://www.cet.com/~pennys/faq/smfaq.htm

What I want for beginners in sewing:

– a machine that doesn’t scare you

– a machine that isn’t balky (cheap new machines are often very

balky or need adjustments often and are rarely repairable —

just too frustrating to learn on!)

– very good straight stitch

– good zigzag (4-5 mm is fine, more than that is gravy)

– a method of making buttonholes that makes sense to you

– adjustable presser foot pressure (which helps some fabric

handling issues)

– accessory presser feet that don’t cost an arm and a leg

(machines that use a “short shank foot” typically handle

generic presser feet pretty well. Some brands of machines use

proprietary or very expensive presser feet)

If the budget stretches far enough:

– blindhem and stretch blindhem stitches

– triple zigzag (nice for elastic applications)

– a couple of decorative stitches (you won’t use them nearly as

much as you think)

– electronic machine because of the needle position control and

because the stepper motors give you full “punching force” at

slow sewing speeds — mechanical machines often will stall at

slow speeds.

Please go to the best sewing machine dealers around and ask them

to show you some machines in your price range, *especially* used

machines you can afford. You’ll get a far better machine buying

used than new, and a good dealer is worth their weight in sewing

machine needles when you get a machine problem — often they can

talk you through the problem over the phone. While you’re trying

things out, try a couple of machines (sewing only, not combo

sewing-embroidery) over your price limit, just so you can see

what the difference in stitch quality and ease of use might be.

You may find you want to go for the used Cadillac. Or you might

want the new basic Chevy. Might as well try both out.

Suggested reading: John Giordano’s The Sewing Machine Book

(especially for used machines), Carol Ahles’ Fine Machine Sewing

(especially the first and last few chapters) and Gale Grigg

Hazen’s Owner’s Guide to Sewing Machines, Sergers and Knitting

Machines. All of these are likely to be available at your public

library.

Used brands I’d particularly look for: Elna, Bernina,

Viking/Husqvarna, Pfaff, Singer (pre 1970), Juki, Toyota

New “bargain brand” I’d probably pick: Janome (who also does

Kenmore).

James asks…

Which are the best brands for portable sewing machines?

I am thinking to give my mother a portable sewing machine on this mother’s day,so please tell me which are the good brands for portable sewing machines.I have heard that telebrands are the worst companies.I want the sewing machine which has suitable price.The cost of telebrands’s easy sew is good but it is not good.So please help me.

admin answers:

I am suggesting you the site where u can compare and shop online all brands and there rates online.

Just click the link-http://www.naaptol.com/buy-online/WO-shopping-best-deals-W189O/consumer_electronics/home_appliances/sewing_machine.html

Joseph asks…

What would a 1905-1910 portable singer sewing machine be worth?

It is in perfect condition without any scratches, the model number is AL324059. I am looking to sell it and would love to know what everybody thinks it would be worth.

Thanks

admin answers:

The model you have is not worth very much. You can check ebay from time to time, but most likely the shipping cost will be 3 times more than the value of the machine.

Sadly, old machines are more valuable as scrap iron.

Exception – a Singer Featherweight.

Sandy asks…

Is there such a thing as portable sewing machine?

admin answers:

If you can pick it up is is portable.

Avoid any that are battery operated or use an AC adapter as they are considered “toys” and do not have enough power to sew anything more than a couple layers of thin fabric.

Modern sewing machines do not come in cabinets.

Mark asks…

I have a 1938 Singer Portable Electric Sewing Machine 221-1 original wood cabinet with all original hardware?

I would like to know the value amount as well as info on a interested buyer.Thank you In Advance!

admin answers:

What is it worth ? What someone will give you for it….

There are people who collect sewing machines, but typically they don’t bring much..

I would google “sewing machine collectors”

or put it on Ebay and see what they bid….

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